Insect Stings

Most people are not allergic to insect stings and should recognize the difference between an allergic reaction and a normal reaction. This will reduce anxiety and prevent unnecessary medical expense.

More than 500,000 people enter hospital emergency rooms every year suffering from insect stings. A severe allergic reaction known as anaphylaxis occurs in 0.5 percent to 5 percent of the U.S. population as a result of insect stings. At least 40 deaths per year result from insect sting anaphylaxis.

The majority of insect stings in the United States come from wasps, yellow jackets, hornets and bees. The red or black imported fire ant now infests more than 260 million acres in the southern United States, where it has become a significant health hazard and may be the number one agent of insect stings.

What Is a Normal Reaction to an Insect Sting, and How Is It Treated?
What Are Symptoms of Insect Sting Allergy?
How Are Allergic Reactions to Insect Stings Treated?
What Is Venom Immunotherapy?
How Can I Avoid Insect Stings?

Source: American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology